25 Awesome Photographs of Londoners

What a brilliant collection appearing in the Flickr pool lately. Here’s 25 of the latest shots of Londoners, a diverse and colourful bunch. And so many talented street photographers out there in this city as you can see! One of my favourite Londoners posts yet.

All Gone
Photo: All Gone, Brick Lane market by Garry Knight

16/100, Koko/London
Photo: Koko fro m Austria by Jonathan Campenni

2012-07-14 Pzb02021
Photo: Dancer by Kath

stranger # 67
P
hoto: Worod from Iraq who has also lived in Iran and travelled extensively by Stretch1000

Brixton
Photo: Brixton by Harry Wakefield

Esther - Stranger 5/100
Photo: Esther Monolo works in Monsoon but has been singing since age 3 by Roj Whitelock

The girl with butterfly tattoo
Photo: The Girl with the Butterfly Tattoo by Xuesong Liao

N'Goni - Stranger 31/100
Photo: N’Goni plays roots reggae on the guitar with Real Sounds by Roj Whitelock

Unwelcome Audience
Photo: Unwelcome Audience by John Kortland

London Street Portrait
Photo: London street portrait by 67Jewels

The Final Cut
Photo: Former film maker and global traveler it’s Arners on the streets of Bloomsbury, Grape Street by Pete Zelewski

stranger # 114
Photo: Mark Powell on Frith Street, Soho by Stretch1000

Claire - Stranger 22/100
Photo: Claire, editor of Entertainmentwise by Roj Whitelock

IMG_4709
Photo: Red Head on Portobello Road by Farlon Rahaman

stranger # 137
Photo: Ashwini from Bangalore who is in London doing a Masters in Sustainable Architecture by Stretch1000

Amara - Stranger 35/100
Photo: Mural artist Amara from Sweden on Brick Lane by Roj Whitelock

Italian student
Photo: Italian student in London by Xuesong Liao

London Street Portraits
Photo: Sue Kreitzman the Wild Old Woman – the Dare To Wear Exhibition at The Crypt by 67Jewels

stranger # 84
Photo: Demi, aspiring Model on Allen Gardens, Spitalfields by Stretch1001

A green haired girl wearing big bow
Photo: Green-haired girl wearing big bow by Xuesong Liao

London Street Portraits
Photo: London street portrait by 67Jewels

stranger # 101
Photo: Olivia wearing an old coat she inherited from her aunt by Stretch1000

Where am I going?
Photo: Where am I going? by Xuesong Liao

Purim in Stamford Hill
Photo: Purim in Stamform Hill by Alan Denney

stranger # 131
Photo: Ruby, whose favourite sound is that of her son’s heartbeat as heard through her husband’s stethoscope by Stretch1000

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Notting Hill Carnival Photos

Notting Hill Carnival is one of those things you must experience once in your lifetime. It’s brilliant to see all of the colourful, vibrant costumes and get caught up in the atmosphere.

Usually though, once is enough, unless you a) live within walking distance b) know someone who lives nearby who will let you use their loo and hang out on their balcony until the crowds disperse or c) are just feeling a bit crazy and don’t mind being packed into the tube and the claustrophobia of crowds similar to those Oxford Street Christmas shoppers but with more chaos and fewer bags.

Untitled
Photo by derRuedi

I skipped it this year, but it is, of course, brilliant for photography and there’s some great photos coming in to the Flickr pool that I want
to share with you!

Notting Hill Carnival
Photo by robhonda1

Notting Hill Carnival
Photo by robhonda1

Notting Hill Carnival
Photo by robhonda1

photo
Photo by maccymacx

Notting Hill Carnival 2012 - Children's Day (Sunday)
Photo by fabiolug

Crap Sign, Carnival
Photo by mrdamcgowan

Chocolate smile
Photo by albertlondon

Luxury
Photo by mrdamcgowan

Notting Hill Carnival - 2012
Photo by Pixel_peeper

Pensive Barbie
Photo by MauScaMe

Check out the feathers
Photo by KISS FM UK

IMG_9096
Photo by dexout

IMG_9178
Photo by dexout

IMG_9544
Photo by dexout

IMG_9505
Photo by dexout

Notting Hill Carnival 2012
Photo by mnadi

Notting Hill Carnival 2012
Photo by mnadi

NHC 20
Photo by DancesWithLight

Notting Hill festival Photo by bayek

So did you go to Carnival this year? Did you participate? What did you think? How did it compare to other years? 

Listen to a Londoner: Mariano Ortiz

Listen to a Londoner is a weekly interview with a Londoner – someone who lives in this city, born here or elsewhere. If you’re up for being interviewed, email littlelondonobservationist@hotmail.co.uk.

Mariano Ortiz

Mariano is a born and bred Londoner. With an emphasis on social integration in everything he does, he loves to engage people through teaching English language, giving salsa dance lessons and playing vallenato accordion. He also runs Latinos in London Ltd.

LLO: Where are you from originally, how long have you been in London and what brought you here?
MO: My parents left Colombia in the seventies. They went to Spain to study at university. As luck would have it, they only met when both were on holiday here in London. They fell in love, got married, then I popped up and the rest was history – our life was to be here in England. I have therefore been here all my life, since 1983, and now enjoy my days running Latinos in London Ltd, teaching English, teacing dance, teaching music, bringing artists in from Latin America for concerts and providing consultancy services to London Concert venues with acts that appeal to Spanish/Portuguese-speaking audiences in London.

LLO: Latinos in London has well over 4,000 members on Facebook. Tell us what it’s all about.
MO: Latinos in London branches off from Timeout London, for whom I did work experience when I finished my A-levels. It will become a fully functioning and interactive website this year. It basically provides English speakers across the world with an insight into Latin American and Iberian happenings in the UK without the biassed coverage most other bodies do because there is indeed no regulator or actively working critical body here. We seek to become that regulator and in addition bring about advancement in all aspects of community and politics but are well aware that the only way to hold the attention of as high a percentage of the public (especially a cross-section of generations) is by focussing on events and providing the service of a comprehensive events and curent affairs media body.

In addition to reporting news and current events both in the UK and abroad, we promote everything from book launches to film screenings via concerts, night clubs, conferences, lectures and many other events. Our site will launch once we have our critical agenda and critical team together because the most important thing we are looking to do is operate a critical and political branch to our project which should hopefully promote improvement and advancement of Latin American / Iberian communities in the UK. We are clearly not all illegal immigrants looking to scrounge off the UK welfare system, nor are we all Saints – thus a clear-speaking unbiassed media body is required by all to tell things as they should be.

Most other bodies are unable (and moreover unwilling) to do this based on:

1. The alliances they have with community groups, consulates, embassies and past or present advertising clients. Spanish language newspaper editors portray our 32 consulates and embassies in the UK as perfectly oiled machines of absolute efficiency when in truth most are far from this. Even more farsical is the tabloid style coverage these bodies give to news related to immigration, by which political candidates are judged to be pro-Latin based only on their backing of “possible future amnesties” – which indeed addresses the many of us in need of regularisation in the UK but portrays us as little more than a community in need of such things when a significant percentage of us would rather see politicians addressing issues concerning trade agreements.

2. The solely financial objectives they have and the limitations these entail: publicity clients, diplomatic bodies, service providers, restaurants and so on cannot be badmouthed or criticised as this will lead to bad business and the small “mafia” of regular advertisers in these newspapers have grown to become “family”.

We, as a community, need to remove ourselves from the ghetto mentality that reigns within too many of us here in the UK and allows things to remain sloppy and half-hearted. Latinos in London Ltd is 100% privately funded and has no restrictions or limitations. It additionally is the only platform producing daily and in English.

LLO: We’re looking for a great Latin American restaurant in London – best food and authentic Latin atmosphere. Recommendations?
MO: My opinion has changed over the years but at the moment I am against frequenting both typically Latin eateries and chain-stores of Macdonald’s style La Tascas, Nandos and Las Iguanas clown feederies. right now I am particularly interested in backing restaurants looking to push integration of that which is Latin American and that which is British/European in all aspects: menu, atmosphere, lighting, wine list, drinks, staff, service, etc.

In summary, my recommendations are Sabor run and owned by my dear friend Esnayder (also interviewed for Listen to a Londoner!) and Arepa & Co run by another visionary and lateral thinker, Gustavito.

LLO: Favourite unique London discovery?
MO: Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club

LLO: Best place to go out dancing or hear some great live Latin American tunes in this city?
MO: My house! I organise a monthly “Vallenato House Party” where people are welcome to experience an authentic Colombian “parranda” (party with live music) with all the essences of typical food, atmosphere and imported drinks. Come along and be transported to any typical Colombian Northern coast house on a weekend evening. Details: www.Vallenato.co.uk

For added fun, check out Latin American harp and clarinet maestros Diego Laverde and Cheveto Requena at Angel and Green Park stations when you get the chance.

LLO:  Which area of London are you most familiar with and what’s your favourite thing about it?
MO: I am still deciding on that!

LLO: Can you tell us about some great resources for Latin Americans coming to London for the first time?
MO: Learning English? Well I have been working as an English teacher and education guidance mentor since 2006 and believe the best advice anyone could ever receive is personalised – so in short, my contact details are 0781 569 65 94 /contact@latinosinlondon.com

LLO: Tell us about a great memory of something that could only have happened in London.
MO: Celebrating Barcelona winning the UEFA champions league a few years ago against Arsenal in Trafalgar Square. Colombian Barcelona supporters, we were playing vallenato into the night. Argentine Barcelona supporters, they were playing Latin rock guitar, Cubans had salsa cow bells and claves  and who were we sorrounded by? Joyous Tottenham Hotspurs supporters cheering and dancing along.

LLO: If you were to leave London in the near future, what 5 things (people not included) would you miss the most about the city?
MO:
1 – The mentality: Most people here do not allow social class and appearances rule their lives.
2 – The culture: Every country of the world is represented in this city
3 – The food: Fancy eating anything from anywhere? look for it in London.
4 – Employment flexibility: Fancy changing careers from sales to dance entertainment and then back again? Only in London.
5 – Night clubs and entertainment venues open 7 nights a week: We don’t know how lucky we are to have these.

LLO: You’ve got a free day to explore a part of the city you’ve never been to. Where do you go and why?
MO: My head hurts now.  😦  I can’t possibly think straight and answer for this. Sorry 😦

Thanks Mariano!

For more Listen to a Londoner posts, click here.

Around Camden

Camden is, without a douubt, one of the most colourful, eccentric and interesting places in London to take a camera. Markets wind off of the main high street, twisting and turning through shops with just about anything you could possibly imagine (except for sushi mats. I didn’t find any of those and I was looking). We ate Turkish lamb and mushroom kebabs and Chinese dumplings then sat by the edge of the canal eating gooey brownies and winter tea made from white tea, vanilla, cinnamon and ginger with orange slices floating on top.

Here’s a handful of Camden photos for today.

Laylie Birds

Tattoo

Cleaning Up the Tables

New Wardrobe, Anyone?

Faded Paint

Singing on Camden Canal

Belts for Sale

Yellow and Pink Shacks

Haven Street Lion

I <3 London

Indian Food

Chinese Food

Icons

If you have any London market pics, add them to the Flickr pool for a chance to be posted.

London Art Spot: Karishma Shahani

Brightly coloured designs marked Karishma Shahani’s award-winning catwalk collection for the London College of Fashion’s Graduate Runway Show 2010. She came away with an award for “Best Surface Textiles” to add to her CV alongside the “Nina De York Fashion Illustration” award and “Fashion Graduate of the Year award.

It’s no surprise her eye-catching work has caught the attention of staff at Vogue, Grazia, Elle and ID magazine alongside quite a few others around the world from France to Russia to Hong King and Japan.

Her values of longevity in clothing, ethical fair trade and using “upcycled” and organic materials match the values of the forward-thinking audience she will reach with her vibrant collections.

For this week’s London Art Spot, Karishma tells us how life in her native India plays a massive part in her work, shows off some photos of latest stunning collection and lets us in on the details of her collaboration with American artist Amy Sol.

LLO: Give us an overview of your latest collection, Yatra.
KS: The collection draws inspiration and elements from the multiple layers of India’s vibrant culture that continuously create colourful, vivid and eclectic experiences for the onlooker. The colours are picked from traditional paintings of Indian Gods, and recreated through natural methods of dyeing. The surface texture adds to the multi-dimensional feel enhancing the use of natural fabrics alongside upcyled packaging materials.

In its essence this collection is a reflection of the Indian lifestyle of re-interpretation of materials and their function at every step; always re-using and recycling; creating heirlooms that are passed down through generations. Each garment is made with beauty, simplicity and versatility as its core which lends it a multi-layered and personality-driven charm. The designs combine a fusion of two extremes, making the collection experimental and unconventional, while being hinged on modern functionality.

LLO: Which aspects of life in your native India most inspire your work? What about aspects of London life?
KS: A lot of aspects ranging from the people on the road, to our vast history, culture, architecture, crafts, travel, the list is endless. London’s cosmopolitan nature is very appealing. Being a melting pot for people from all around the world is quite inspiring. UK too has a comprehensive history and its ties with India are aspects I like exploring.

LLO: Tell us about some of the materials that have gone into your latest collection – the bright colours, the recycled concept, etc. What’s the most unusual material you used or the most difficult to obtain?
KS: The materials in the collection range from calico and cotton to pure silk and silk tulle and then over to High Density Polyethylene (HDPE). The last being a material used extensively in packaging in India hence lending to the upcycled nature of this collection as the patterns were cut from previously used sacks. All the material in the collection barring the HDPE have been hand dyed to suit the colour requirements that give enough homage to their source of inspiration. The accessories include secondhand hand-painted shoes and piece from chandeliers, cut away sneakers and blankets. The toughest material to obtain was the HDPE due to its varied sizes and quality control it required to obtain large pieces to create the garments.

LLO: Do you remember a precise moment that made you decide you wanted to have a career in fashion?
KS: Just the simple fact of creating new things. Consciously or without realising, clothing plays an important part in defining a person’s personality for the onlooker and I’ve always found this aspect really interesting. So I can’t pinpoint a precise moment.

LLO:Which signature elements of your designs make them unique to you?
KS: Colour, texture, contrast

LLO: Not only have you won some impressive awards (including “Best Surface Textiles 2010 LCF BA Graduate Show”, “Nina De York Illustration Award 2010” and “Fashion Graduate of the Year 2010 British Graduate 100 Award”) but you also started your own label. What has been your proudest moment so far in your fashion career?
KS: Receiving the “Best Surface Textile Award” at the London College of Fashion Graduate show 2010 was a great way to graduate, a fulfilling pat of encouragement.

LLO: Your bio includes a degree in economics, experience in at an NGO and a stint as a production manager. Does your career background have an impact on the way you approach fashion?
KS: Yes it does. I do think that one needs to know all the aspects of the industry they are a part of; it’s not about mastering all aspects but just simply about knowing how things work, because everything works hand-in-hand. All my previous work experiences have shaped my outlook towards design and its end result. The work has made me travel and live in various cities, that in itself is an enriching experience.

 

LLO: Where’s your favourite place in London to gather fashion inspiration – both in the shops and on the streets?
KS: Camden Town. One of my absolute favourites. I love how you can find ‘anything’ in the market and see ‘anyone’ on the streets. It always puts me in awe at the diversity that is around us.

LLO: Any other up-and-coming London-based designers we should keep an eye on?
KS: Felicity Brown, Manjit Deu, David Longshaw to name just a few.

LLO: What’s next for you?
KS: I am currently working on developing an AW 11 collection, alongside a brand that further promotes social responsibility and traditional techniques for a sustainable future of products and fashion; that continues to become more aware of its power to change and assist changes in lives of all those involved. Alongside this, I am working on a collaboration project with American artist Amy Sol, whose phantasmagorical paintings always depict girls in flowing dresses wandering through luscious landscapes. This project for a social eco-fashion enterprise called “Jhoole”, a non-profit business, designed to uplift female artisans based in a weaver’s village in rural Madhya Pradesh, India which will culminate in exhibitions and fashion shows in the summer of 2011. Another, being a textile development project for a textile producer based on recyclability and sustainability of fabrics combined with a base to provide further work for craftspeople in different regions of India.

Thanks Karishma!

For more London Art Spot interviews, click here.