Brompton Cemetery Birds

Leaves are changing colour in Brompton Cemetery and the birds just seem to be sitting around watching the season turn. On the Old Brompton Road end, a huge number of birds gathers in the street and surrounding tombs and monuments…

Brompton Cemetery Birds

It’s a peaceful walk from one end to the other, the scent of Autumn creeping out of the ground now, people quietly jogging around or reading books on the benches.

Waiting

There are still flowers in bloom, raspberries growing along the railway tracks on the far side and as you can see, plenty of wildlife.

Bird and Cross

Enjoy the birds!

Perched

And a fake one….

Bird on Stick

Elephants 111-120

Another dose of Elephant Parade for Thursday morning. Here’s numbers 111-120.

111. Mother Nature by Hannes D’haese; The Hempel
MOTHER NATURE

112. Tara by Mark Shand; Hyde Park – Speaker’s Corner
Tara

113. Monopoly Community Chest by Hasbro & Invited Artists; Hamleys Toy Store
Monopoly Community Chest

114. Zambi by Donna Goes; Hamleys Toy Store
Project Zambi

115. Eco the Elephant by Haverstock School & Olswang LLP; originally in High Holborn
Eco the Elephant

Eco the Elephant

116. Hornbill by Helen Cowcher; More London
Hornbill

117. Untitled by India Jane Birley; Queens Walk – Hungerford Bridge
Untitled

Untitled

118. Candy by Isaac Mizrahi; Carnaby Street/Marlborough Street
Candy

119. Oli by Issa; South Molton Street
Oli

Oli

120. The Singing Butler Rides Again by Jack Vettriano; Burlington Arcade
The Singing Butler Rides Again

For more photos, interviews and other info, visit my Elephant Parade page. Stay tuned for the rest!

Brixton Market

I rarely get down to Brixton, but the village is a great place to pick up some unique fruits and veggies and try some Caribbean food. Jerk chicken – mmmm. Last Saturday I went to catch up with some friends and took a few photos while we were there. I bought some mamon, round green fruit that grows on little branches. You crack open the shell with your teeth, take the peach coloured fleshy fruit in your mouth and use your teeth to scrape it off the small pit in the middle. We also tried buñuelos which are deep-fried doughy balls. Brixton’s got a unique vibe you won’t find anywhere else in London. If you haven’t been, it’s worth it. Bus 159 from Piccadilly Circus or the Victoria Line straight down to the end.

Record Exchange

Brixton Village

Fish for Sale

Salmon Heads

IMG_5108

Brixton Market Meat

Brixton Mural

If you’re got your own Brixton pictures you’d like to share, add them to the Flickr pool.

London Art Spot: Perry Sullivan

Not for innocent eyes, Perry sullivan draws on themes of sexuality, human form and politics to create a body of work that sometimes has a shock value with that can’t-peel-your-eyes-away sort of appeal. Some are disturbing, some may be offensive, but his goal is to draw on real bits of life that people can relate to rather than pretentious conceptual art that’s not always so easy to understand.

Perry is a master of line, light, shadow and form that gives life to the figures in his paintings. He will be showing them off at the Brick Lane Gallery until tomorrow so there’s still time to pop in.

For this week’s London Art Spot, he’s answered all of my (sometimes cheeky two-part) questions about his goal to make traditional figure painting appeal to a more contemporary audience, shares one of the most memorable comments from a buyer and of course gives us an eyeful of images to get a real feel for his work.

LLO: Which aspects of London life most influence your creativity?
PS:
The history. When I go to galleries and museums I think of all the people who have been a part of the city’s culture and I am pleased to be part of that in some small way.

LLO:  There’s sexuality, human form, some religious and mythological elements… Talk us through some of the common themes that flow through your work.
PS:
I would like to think the common theme in my work is humour. Being British I love to take the piss and there is a great deal of tounge in cheek in my work. I started to copy superheros from comic books as a kid. I think if I wasn’t a painter I’d be a cartoonist as I love to have a pop at deserving targets such as celebs, bankers, footballers, the church, politicians, etc. These are themes I return to time and again in my work.

LLO: If we wanted to walk around a recent exhibition of your work with an iPod, which songs would you recommend as a soundtrack to complement the mood of the show?
PS:
The Banana Splits Theme

LLO: You say you want to revive traditional figure painting and bring it into the contemporary world. How do you approach your work with this goal in mind? Which elements are most important to accomplish this?
PS:
Hang on, that’s two questions. Do I get extra brownie points or somthing? I set out to make my work say something to people who may feel that art is just people pushing paint about and slaping themselves on the back for doing so. (Frieze Art Fair). I want them to be able to connect with the painting in a real way, to know what it is they’re looking at and then go on to see deeper into the work. I think that once again humour is a helpful element and of course sex.

LLO: Do you have a muse?
PS:
Me. Sorry, did you mean someone I adore who fills me with love, hope, energy and light? Still me I am afraid.

LLO: One of your other interests is books. What are you reading now? Do you find that what you’re reading tends to have any influence on your artwork?
PS:
At this moment I am reading my Open University coursework as I am just about to start on my history degree. Just wanted to do something fun. You would think I’d say a Nigella Lawson cookbook looking at my work. But apart from those early years reading comics I don’t think what I read (outside Saturday’s Guardian) has any effect on my work.

LLO: Which painting are you most proud of right now and why?
PS:
The last one I did for the Brick Lane show called ‘Lest We Remember’. I am proud of it not because of the painting as such, but of the style. I was running out of time if I wanted to get it in the show so I put the paint on quicker and looser when I realized it had a real freshness and energy. I felt that I was in charge of the paint and it was going to do what I damn well wanted it to do as there was no time for debate. I love Rembrant’s work as it got looser and looser and I thought to myself ‘I get it’. You can’t see a photo of it just yet as it’s still in the exhibition but if you get down to the Brick Lane Gallery before Oct 4th you can see it in the flesh.

LLO: What has been the most memorable comment you’ve had about your paintings? Did you agree with it?
PS:
“How much? You robbing bastard!” No really, it was at one of my exhibitions when a woman came up to me after looking at my piece ‘Soft Cell’ and with tears in her eyes said “Thats how I feel”. Well what could i say? She brought the painting. Don’t think I didn’t notice this question as well as number six was also in two parts. Iam going to put in for overtime here.

LLO: Are there any other London-based artists you admire?
PS:
Luican Freud (is he still alive?)

LLO: What are you working on now?
PS: I am working on a still life called ‘The Beautiful Game’, it’s about corruption, greed and sex within football. So rich pickings there.

Thanks Perry!

For more London Art Spot interviews, click here.